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The Wedding Vase


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Wedding Vases!
Believed to have originated in South America, the wedding vase has been a part of Pueblo life for centuries. The graceful spouts represent two separate lives. The bridge at the top part of the vessel unites these together as one. The future husband's parents provide the wedding vase in Indian ceremonies. This happens two weeks before marriage and is a very festive time. Gifts and advice are given to the bride and groom as they prepare to establish their new home together. On their wedding day, this vase is filled with Indian holy water, which has been blessed by a Shaman or Priest, and given to the bride. She drinks from one side of the vessel while the groom partakes from the opposite side. This ceremony is equivalent to the exchanging of wedding bands. The couple will cherish their wedding vase throughout their married life.

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